Overview of Film Societies and Communities

There are plenty of filmmaking communities thriving in their love for film; film societies share a love for filmmaking throughout the world. Filmmaking communities and film societies share a love for creating and watching films.

Filmmaking Communities

Filmmaking Communities - Overview of Film Societies and Communities

Filmmaking Communities are groups of people interested and active in making films. To join these communities, one needs to possess skills in film production.

Crew skills needed to become members are cinematographers, directors, producers, and more. These communities work together in discussing and viewing films and creating indie films and ideas.

Filmmaking communities are found worldwide and involve mostly inexperienced filmmakers working together to create projects with lower budgets and without support from the larger development and distribution companies.

Joining a filmmaking community is beneficial to any individual interested in filmmaking who possesses some skills and talent for filming. These communities can strengthen the abilities of each member and provide them with more experience knowledge.

Film societies

A film society is a membership-based club for individuals to watch screenings of films that would usually not be shown in mainstream cinemas and channels. In the USA, the term “film societies” is used, whereas, in many countries such as Spain, Ireland, and Italy, it’s known as Cineclubs.

Film societies aim to introduce new audiences to audiovisual works through an organized and prepared program of screenings of films not well known.

A film screening through film societies usually starts with informing the audience with an introduction to the film. The introduction will consist of information on how the film was developed and produced and the main idea behind the film.

There are different film societies networks in every country. These are organized into federations and local networks. Some of the most famous film societies include Amos Vogel’s Cinema 16, the Film societies of Lincoln Center, and Cinematheque Francaise.

The film societies movement started in France in the time frame between two world wars. The international body of the societies is the International Federation of Film Societies and was set up in 1947 in Cannes (France) with groups of film societies in countries spanning all over the world.